President Biden restores Great American Outdoors Act to protect public lands

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Jake Taber
Content Creator

Author: Jake Taber

Content Creator

Started on staff: 2017
B.A., cum laude, Tufts University

As a member of the Creative Team for the Public Interest Network, Jake writes and designs materials for Environment America and its network of state-based organizations. Jake got his start with Environment America's program team as a Clean Energy Associate, where he worked with students to organize campaigns for 100 percent renewable energy at dozens of campuses across the country, and helped win commitments from Boston University and Vanderbilt University. Jake lives in Somerville, Massachusetts, where he enjoys cooking, reading and attempting to learn woodworking.

The greatest conservation victory in a generation has been saved from a last-ditch effort to undermine it.
 
On Feb. 12, 2021, the Biden administration undid last-minute changes that the Trump administration made to the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) — which maintains parks, lands and even ballfields all across the country. The changes would have created procedural hurdles to gum up the Great American Outdoors Act, passed last summer to guarantee adequate funds for LWCF.
 
"We’re thrilled to see the new administration fix this problem," said Alex Petersen, conservation advocate with Environment America. "Americans love the great outdoors, and there’s nothing more American than conserving the natural wonders that surround us all."
 
Passed along bipartisan lines, the Great American Outdoors Act secured billions in funding for the places we cherish and visit with family and friends.
 
Read more.

Photo: Grand Teton National Park: one of many beloved places that will benefit from a boosted LWCF. Credit: Korkeakoski via Shutterstock

Jake Taber
Content Creator

Author: Jake Taber

Content Creator

Started on staff: 2017
B.A., cum laude, Tufts University

As a member of the Creative Team for the Public Interest Network, Jake writes and designs materials for Environment America and its network of state-based organizations. Jake got his start with Environment America's program team as a Clean Energy Associate, where he worked with students to organize campaigns for 100 percent renewable energy at dozens of campuses across the country, and helped win commitments from Boston University and Vanderbilt University. Jake lives in Somerville, Massachusetts, where he enjoys cooking, reading and attempting to learn woodworking.